Giles Ryder |  Beyond the field / Linéaire/ Lineair

23 August – 22 September 2018

 

 

 

 

“When he shall die,

“When he shall die,

Take him and cut him out in little stars,

And he will make the face of heaven so fine

That all the world will be in love with night

And pay no worship to the garish sun.” 

– William ShakespeareRomeo and Juliet

 

 

Beyond the field / Linéaire/ Lineair

 

Giles Ryder will be presenting a focused neon exhibition for MARS Gallery a spatial interplay in the gallery space, both an architectural / painterly interaction within MARS Gallery.

 

Conceptually furthering his use of reduction (of form: space: line and material) in conflict to this reduction, the conflation of material presence (with intensity of matter and colour) and the specifics of the exhibition space. More over the effect of colour (visual: as signature: and psychological effects) are presented within the experiential knowledge of painting.

 

This exhibition will present material and immaterial effects from the use of light, an ongoing interest of Ryder, in the potentiality of materials to express concretely and poetically via his spatial interplays. The space contains free formed shapes linear lines travelling above the viewer, interconnecting colours will be floating from the gallery ceiling producing space like structures and primitive diagrammatic dialogues all floating within the gallery. The immaterial effect is harnessed via the cast light onto the gallery walls that softly contrasts to that of the hard neon lines. Interconnecting with this wallwork neon’s with combined materials will also be exhibited. Further to this a soft architectural ‘space pod’ will be within the gallery in which to ‘view’ the above and used as a downplayed / empty social space.

 

Ryder presents a crude cosmology where by one isn’t quite sure of how to locate the experience – one part Science, another part Abstraction, one part Science fiction, another could be a night space in disarray – displaced and abruptly clashing against the correctness of a lot of todays ‘contemporary’ art. For now we know that light is no longer a constant and its experience is upon the ‘speed’ of the witness. All is at once a faded memory of what was at one point a probable and optimistic future, for therein lies the corruption of forms.

 

 

“There is a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in.”

– Leonard Cohen